Coins of the Fatimid Period

The Fatimid caliphate was established in 909 in North Africa, and soon extended into Sicily, Egypt, Palestine and Syria reaching the peak of its power during the long reign of the 8th Fatimid Imam-caliph al-Mustansir bi’llah (d. 1094). During this period of almost 2 centuries, the Fatimids created a prosperous state with a remarkable intellectual, economic and cultural vitality.

The obverse has a 2 line inscription in the centre field and 3 concentric circles, with inscriptions in the outer and inner circle.

The reverse has a 2 line inscription in the centre field, which reads al-Hakim bi Amr Allah. The inscription in the outer circle provides the mint name and date, while the inscription in the inner circle reads ‘Abd Allah wa walihi al-Mansur Abu ‘Ali al-Imam.

The appearance of al-Qahira al-Mahrusa (Cairo the Protected) as the mint name is extremely rare and significant, and it is likely that this coin was a special issue to commemorate the completion of the walls of the city of Cairo in the same year. 

The legends on the obverse and reverse of this coin are inscribed within 3 concentric circles. The innermost circle on the reverse includes the caliphal title of the Imam-Caliph Nizar, al-Mustafa li Din Allah, while the outer circle provides the mint name and date.

This coin is unique and of the highest rarity.

Reverse: has a five-line inscription in the centre field, which reads ‘Abd Allah Isma‘il al-Imam al-Mansur bi’llah Amir al-Mu’minin. The marginal inscription provides the mint name and date. Obverse: has a 3 line inscription in the centre field, which consists of the kalima. The marginal inscription consists of verse 33 from Chapter 9 of the Holy Qur’an.

Obverse: the centre field consists of the kalima, and the marginal inscription consists of verse 33 from Chapter 9 of the Holy Qur’an. Reverse: the centre field has the name and title of the Imam, and the marginal inscription provides the mint name and date.

The inscriptions on the Fatimid coinage of Sicily have a distinctive ornamental arrangement; as such, they are referred to as the ‘stellate’ or ‘windmill’ type.

Reverse: has a 5 line inscription in the centre field, which includes al-Imam al-Qa’im bi Amr Allah Amir al-Mu’minin. The inner marginal inscription provides the mint name and date, while the outer marginal inscription consists of verse 115 from Chapter 6 of the Holy Qur’an.

Obverse: has a 5 line inscription in the centre field, which includes the name Muhammad Abu’l-Qasim. The marginal inscription consists of verse 33 from Chapter 9 of the Holy Qur’an.

Source: IIS

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About Ahmad Ladhani

Teacher, an Accountant and a student :)
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